Nutritional suppliments for children

Although dietary supplements for children are safe, speak with your

health

care provider before giving your children dietary supplements. Be sure to follow the label directions. Avoid supplements with large doses (called mega-doses) of anything. Some dietary supplements such as iron, and vitamins A or D can become toxic in large amounts. Keep adult vitamins out of the reach of toddlers and young children. Dietary supplement formulas and ingrediants are not standardized and quality is not well regulated by government agencies. Avoid supplements made by companies that attempt to make health

claims such as improves immune system function or increases brain function. These claims are almost always unsubstantiated. Don't attempt to treat any

health

conditions with supplements unless without the guidance of your

health

care provider. Fortified or Enriched Foods Some of the foods your child is eating may already be fortified or enriched with supplemental vitamins and minerals. Milk has vitamin D added to it, many breakfast cereals have a long list of added vitamins and minerals, most bread has extra iron and B vitamins, and B vitamins and orange juice is sometimes sold with calcium added to the juice. Don't rely on dietary supplements as a substitute for eating

healthy

foods. Continue to encourage your child to eat a balanced diet including plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, dairy products (or other calcium sources), and

healthy

fat sources such as olive oil, nuts and seeds. Sources of omega-3 fatty acids are important too. Include fish, seafood, pumpkin seeds or walnuts in you child's diet

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